At first glance, Pioneer "Oops All Spells" may appear like a gimmick, thanks to the goofy name, the odd deck sizes, and its association with bad glass cannon Legacy decks. Don't be fooled though! Oops is not only fast, but consistent and resilient to interaction and hate. I believe it to be the best deck in Pioneer by a significant margin.

If you're into solving puzzles, or just winning all of your matches, you don't want to miss out on playing Oops All Spells.

Magic: The Gathering TCG Deck - Oops All Spells by Baker Neenan

'Oops All Spells' - constructed deck list and prices for the Magic: The Gathering Trading Card Game from TCGplayer Infinite!

Created By: Baker Neenan

Event:

Rank:

Pioneer

Market Price: $287.31

Cards

Blackbloom Rogue

Color Identity:B

Market Price: $0.10

ImageURL: https://tcgplayer-cdn.tcgplayer.com/product/222070_200w.jpg

Menace (This creature can't be blocked except by two or more creatures.)
Blackbloom Rogue gets +3/+0 as long as an opponent has eight or more cards in their graveyard.

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Driven // Despair

Color Identity:B,G

Market Price: $0.45

ImageURL: https://tcgplayer-cdn.tcgplayer.com/product/135011_200w.jpg

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Natural State

Color Identity:G

Market Price: $0.15

ImageURL: https://tcgplayer-cdn.tcgplayer.com/product/111056_200w.jpg

Destroy target artifact or enchantment with mana value 3 or less.

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Narcomoeba

Color Identity:U

Market Price: $0.26

ImageURL: https://tcgplayer-cdn.tcgplayer.com/product/175194_200w.jpg

Flying
When Narcomoeba is put into your graveyard from your library, you may put it onto the battlefield.

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Silversmote Ghoul

Color Identity:B

Market Price: $0.18

ImageURL: https://tcgplayer-cdn.tcgplayer.com/product/236563_200w.jpg

At the beginning of your end step, if you gained 3 or more life this turn, return Silversmote Ghoul from your graveyard to the battlefield tapped.
{1}{B}, Sacrifice Silversmote Ghoul: Draw a card.

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Tangled Florahedron

Color Identity:G

Market Price: $0.38

ImageURL: https://tcgplayer-cdn.tcgplayer.com/product/221925_200w.jpg

{T}: Add {G}.

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Sea Gate Restoration

Color Identity:U

Market Price: $11.50

ImageURL: https://tcgplayer-cdn.tcgplayer.com/product/222038_200w.jpg

Draw cards equal to the number of cards in your hand plus one. You have no maximum hand size for the rest of the game.

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Turntimber Symbiosis

Color Identity:G

Market Price: $2.27

ImageURL: https://tcgplayer-cdn.tcgplayer.com/product/222409_200w.jpg

Look at the top seven cards of your library. You may put a creature card from among them onto the battlefield. If that card has mana value 3 or less, it enters with three additional +1/+1 counters on it. Put the rest on the bottom of your library in a random order.

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Haunted Dead

Color Identity:B

Market Price: $0.13

ImageURL: https://tcgplayer-cdn.tcgplayer.com/product/120006_200w.jpg

When Haunted Dead enters the battlefield, create a 1/1 white Spirit creature token with flying.
{1}{B}, Discard two cards: Return Haunted Dead from your graveyard to the battlefield tapped.

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Eldritch Evolution

Color Identity:G

Market Price: $5.97

ImageURL: https://tcgplayer-cdn.tcgplayer.com/product/120003_200w.jpg

As an additional cost to cast this spell, sacrifice a creature.
Search your library for a creature card with mana value X or less, where X is 2 plus the sacrificed creature's mana value. Put that card onto the battlefield, then shuffle. Exile Eldritch Evolution.

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Thoughtseize

Color Identity:B

Market Price: $12.25

ImageURL: https://tcgplayer-cdn.tcgplayer.com/product/218934_200w.jpg

Target player reveals their hand. You choose a nonland card from it. That player discards that card. You lose 2 life.

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Sylvan Caryatid

Color Identity:G

Market Price: $4.43

ImageURL: https://tcgplayer-cdn.tcgplayer.com/product/71045_200w.jpg

Defender, hexproof
{T}: Add one mana of any color.

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Prized Amalgam

Color Identity:B,U

Market Price: $1.43

ImageURL: https://tcgplayer-cdn.tcgplayer.com/product/116232_200w.jpg

Whenever a creature enters the battlefield, if it entered from your graveyard or you cast it from your graveyard, return Prized Amalgam from your graveyard to the battlefield tapped at the beginning of the next end step.

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Duress

Color Identity:B

Market Price: $0.02

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Target opponent reveals their hand. You choose a noncreature, nonland card from it. That player discards that card.

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Balustrade Spy

Color Identity:B

Market Price: $0.12

ImageURL: https://tcgplayer-cdn.tcgplayer.com/product/145406_200w.jpg

Flying
When Balustrade Spy enters the battlefield, target player reveals cards from the top of their library until they reveal a land card, then puts those cards into their graveyard.

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Hagra Mauling

Color Identity:B

Market Price: $0.75

ImageURL: https://tcgplayer-cdn.tcgplayer.com/product/222096_200w.jpg

This spell costs {1} less to cast if an opponent controls no basic lands.
Destroy target creature.

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Agadeem's Awakening

Color Identity:B

Market Price: $13.58

ImageURL: https://tcgplayer-cdn.tcgplayer.com/product/222163_200w.jpg

Return from your graveyard to the battlefield any number of target creature cards that each have a different mana value X or less.

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Abrupt Decay

Color Identity:B,G

Market Price: $4.84

ImageURL: https://tcgplayer-cdn.tcgplayer.com/product/128562_200w.jpg

This spell can't be countered.
Destroy target nonland permanent with mana value 3 or less.

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Worldspine Wurm

Color Identity:G

Market Price: $6.90

ImageURL: https://tcgplayer-cdn.tcgplayer.com/product/66448_200w.jpg

Trample
When Worldspine Wurm dies, create three 5/5 green Wurm creature tokens with trample.
When Worldspine Wurm is put into a graveyard from anywhere, shuffle it into its owner's library.

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Undercity Informer

Color Identity:B

Market Price: $0.32

ImageURL: https://tcgplayer-cdn.tcgplayer.com/product/67435_200w.jpg

{1}, Sacrifice a creature: Target player reveals cards from the top of their library until they reveal a land card, then puts those cards into their graveyard.

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Paradise Druid

Color Identity:G

Market Price: $0.16

ImageURL: https://tcgplayer-cdn.tcgplayer.com/product/243832_200w.jpg

Paradise Druid has hexproof as long as it's untapped. (It can't be the target of spells or abilities your opponents control.)
{T}: Add one mana of any color.

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Thassa's Oracle

Color Identity:U

Market Price: $7.80

ImageURL: https://tcgplayer-cdn.tcgplayer.com/product/206926_200w.jpg

When Thassa's Oracle enters the battlefield, look at the top X cards of your library, where X is your devotion to blue. Put up to one of them on top of your library and the rest on the bottom of your library in a random order. If X is greater than or equal to the number of cards in your library, you win the game. (Each {U} in the mana costs of permanents you control counts toward your devotion to blue.)

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Necromentia

Color Identity:B

Market Price: $0.37

ImageURL: https://tcgplayer-cdn.tcgplayer.com/product/215470_200w.jpg

Choose a card name other than a basic land card name. Search target opponent's graveyard, hand, and library for any number of cards with that name and exile them. That player shuffles, then creates a 2/2 black Zombie creature token for each card exiled from their hand this way.

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Bala Ged Recovery

Color Identity:G

Market Price: $2.92

ImageURL: https://tcgplayer-cdn.tcgplayer.com/product/221901_200w.jpg

Return target card from your graveyard to your hand.

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Creeping Chill

Color Identity:B

Market Price: $0.25

ImageURL: https://tcgplayer-cdn.tcgplayer.com/product/176732_200w.jpg

Creeping Chill deals 3 damage to each opponent and you gain 3 life.
When Creeping Chill is put into your graveyard from your library, you may exile it. If you do, Creeping Chill deals 3 damage to each opponent and you gain 3 life.

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How the Deck Wins

Step one is to target yourself with either an Undercity Informer activation, or a Balustrade Spy trigger. This will mill your entire deck since it contains no lands, triggering your copies of Creeping Chill to drain your opponent. Since you gained 3 or more life, the copies of Silversmote Ghoul will return to the battlefield on your end step, which in turn will cause every Prized Amalgam in your graveyard to return to the battlefield on your opponent's next end step.

Altogether, that's 12 damage and 21 power to attack with the next turn, which should be more than enough to win the game under most circumstances. If your opponent has blockers, you can also cast the Despair half of Driven // Despair to give all your creatures menace.

The two copies of Worldspine Wurm ensure that you don't lose before getting a chance to attack. If both are in your hand, you can discard them to Haunted Dead to buy yourself two more turns and rebuy any dead copies of Prized Amalgam.

If your Haunted Dead is killed again, whether by your opponent or by sacrificing it to Undercity Informer yourself, you can repeat this process. You can also discard Worldspine Wurm to Haunted Dead on your own upkeep to avoid drawing from an empty library.

Narcomoeba allows you to bring back Prized Amalgam even if your opponent prevents you from gaining life to deny Silversmote Ghoul triggers. It also allows you to return copies of Prized Amalgam on your own end step to prevent your opponent from untapping and playing a card that wipes your graveyard.

Sometimes it's beneficial to wait for the Amalgams to return until your opponent's end step though, as that allows you to keep lethal power in play through a sweeper. Fortunately, returning Narcomoeba to the battlefield is optional, so you can just choose not to in matchups and situations where playing around sweepers is warranted.

Why Play More than 60 Cards?

"Don't play more cards than you have to" is the number one rule of Magic deck building, and for good reason. Any 61st card you add to your deck is almost by definition worse than the first 60, and substantially worse than your best few cards. Even in decks that play a small number of tutor targets they'd rather not draw, the average card in those decks is still much better than any potential 61st card.

So what's different about Oops All Spells? Well, first there is a question of magnitude. Every one of the combo pieces discussed above, a whopping total of 16, is essentially useless to draw. That's more than a quarter of a 60-card deck that we actively don't want to draw! The punishment for drawing a combo piece is very minor, so the fear of drawing them alone isn't enough to warrant exceeding 60 cards, but with that many poor draws in the deck it's feasible for additional cards to actually be an improvement to our average draw quality.

Oops All Spells is still a one-card combo deck though, so we're only interested in a card if it increases the consistency of our strong draws, not just because it's more useful to draw than a Prized Amalgam. As long as we have additional effective copies of our mill enablers though, adding them along with the lands to cast them can actually make our deck more consistent, even if it takes us above sixty cards.

The next question then, is where do we stop? After all, a 70-card deck with four copies of Neoform has a higher proportion of mill enablers than our 64-card deck with none. The answer is that access to mill isn't the only limitation. Thanks to the restriction of only being able to play the modal double-faced lands from Zendikar Rising, we're limited to only 12 untapped lands that produce useful colors of mana. We also have access to zero dual lands, which makes pushing the deck size upward dangerous. The larger your deck is, the more variance is introduced into your draws. In layman's terms, that means you're more likely to draw all black lands or all green lands and end up color screwed the larger your deck is.

There's also the issue of drawing a mana dork to consider. A mana dork on turn two is necessary to kill our opponent on turn four, and only Paradise Druid and Sylvan Caryatid serve as reliable ramp options for these purposes. Tangled Florahedron helps provide some redundancy, but it's susceptible to removal and crucially doesn't produce blue mana for Neoform. Drawing an extra mill card doesn't do us much good if we have to mulligan anyway because we can't cast it on time, and there are several matchups where speed is crucial. Needing these somewhat specific pieces alongside our mill enablers means the additional value gained from adding more enablers rapidly decreases the more of them we add.

The last thing to consider when deciding how far above 60 to go is our sideboard. Sideboard cards are naturally limited in quantity, so keeping our maindeck as small as possible maximizes our chances of drawing any sideboard card we board in. We also regularly board in more cards than we board out, following the same logic that determined we're willing to go above 60 in the main in the first place. This takes the issues with drawing untapped lands and mana dorks to another level. Even if we're willing to reduce our odds of drawing those cards by playing a 70-card maindeck, we have to also be willing to reduce them even further by playing a 75-card post-board to make the larger deck worthwhile.

Our interest in increasing our deck size starts to run out around twelve enablers, so the exact stopping point largely comes down to whether we consider Neoform on par with the other enablers or noticeably worse. If it's close, the first copy or two of Neoform is worth making the deck bigger.

The necessity of a blue source is already one major strike against Neoform, as that makes casting it off Tangled Florahedron or assorted other creatures much more difficult. We also don't want to run too many of the sacrifice tutors, as drawing multiple copies of them makes it much more difficult to present a follow-up threat when the first one is met with countermagic. Along those lines, Neoform also suffers from being vulnerable to Mystical Dispute, a card that many opponents will board in to replace something useless like Fatal Push. Overall, that's enough downside to consider Neoform substantially worse and stay closer to 60.

The final consideration is how many lands to play. The fact that we only need one spell to win the game insulates us from flooding pretty heavily, as does the fact that literally every land in our deck can also double as a spell if necessary, which is a strong incentive to play extra lands. Playing extra lands helps our color fixing too, as just drawing more lands total increases the chance of having all the colors we need.

As mentioned earlier, we often board into a larger deck in games two and three. This means we want to play a couple more lands than we actually need in game one so that we have enough for the larger deck after sideboarding. Twenty-eight lands gets us to a reasonable total for even our largest configurations, while still being reasonable for game one.

When to Mulligan

Oops, All Spell operates very well on low resources, so we can afford to mulligan very aggressively to our best draws. As a general rule, a six or seven-card hand in game one must have at least two lands (at least one green, at least one untapped), a mana dork, and a way to mill ourselves to be worth keeping. Once we're at five cards we'll settle for mana sources and a mill card though.

Post-board gets a little trickier, as once an opponent has boarded in graveyard hate we effectively need a two-card combo of mill plus Thassa's Oracle, or mill plus interaction for the graveyard hate. We still mulligan any hands without a way to mill ourselves, but we'll keep hands that only pair it with interaction and some mana sources instead of aggressively digging for a turn-three kill.

You do still keep turn-three kill hands without sideboard cards as well. Doing so guarantees your ability to race any hand your opponent kept without graveyard hate, and if they spend cards and mana on graveyard hate in the early turns you'll have plenty of time to assemble counterplay via your draw steps.

On Thassa's Oracle

Thassa's Oracle offers Oops All Spells a lot of resilience, and is a major part of why this deck is so good. Thassa's Oracle plus a way to mill ourselves is a two-card combo, but it circumvents graveyard hate entirely and allows you to win without entering combat or passing the turn. The latter is especially valuable against decks that board in cards like Slaughter Games or Unmoored Ego and name Worldspine Wurm.

Playing a mill card and an Oracle in the same turn is a lot of mana, but you can speed the process up if you can untap with an Undercity Informer in play and only need mana for the Oracle. If you have an Undercity Informer in play, you can even use Eldritch Evolution sacrificing another creature to find Thassa's Oracle and sacrifice Informer to itself with the Oracle trigger on the stack to empty your deck out. This backup option is easy enough to set up by just having one copy of Oracle in the deck, so we board in at least one copy in literally every matchup as insurance against graveyard hate.

You do need to keep your blue devotion in mind when trying to win with Thassa's Oracle. If Worldspine Wurm successfully shuffles back into your deck and your opponent removes the Thassa's Oracle, you won't have enough devotion to win the game. Narcomoeba and Prized Amalgam each offer one devotion, so if there's only one Worldspine Wurm in your deck you can use one of them to protect yourself from removal.

Sideboard and Matchup Guide

Before we get into specific matchups, we need to address a quirk of this deck. Similar to how we were willing to play more than the minimum number of cards in our maindeck, we're also willing to go even further in sideboarding and board in more cards than we board out. After all, we still typically want most or all of our combo pieces to win the game after milling our deck away, and we still want to draw the cards that let us mill ourselves as often as possible. So don't be alarmed or think something is missing when I tell you to board six cards in and zero out in a matchup.

Vs. Boros Burn

+1 Thassa's Oracle
+3 Abrupt Decay
+2 Natural State

Burn loses the race in this matchup very badly, especially when you have Sylvan Caryatid to block their 2-power creatures. Boarding in all the removal helps ensure we don't lose to Soul-Guide Lantern, and drawing extra removal just buys us time against their clock anyway.

Two things to consider about timing your removal on Soul-Guide Lantern—they can give it indestructible with Boros Charm if you cast your spell into open mana, but using your spell preemptively could allow them to return the Soul-Guide Lantern with Lurrus of the Dream-Den if they're given enough of a window before you combo off.

Vs. Orzhov Auras

+1 Thassa's Oracle
+3 Abrupt Decay
+2 Natural State

This matchup is a race similar to Boros Burn, but with the complication that they're capable of producing a huge lifelink creature and outlasting your ability to win via combat damage. You can still beat this though, provided you can keep an Undercity Informer around when comboing off. Then you can sacrifice Haunted Dead and Prized Amalgam targeting them to slowly mill them out while blocking, and discard both copies of Worldspine Wurm to recur them every other turn.

Vs. Sultai Reclamation

+4 Thoughtseize
+1 Duress
+1 Thassa's Oracle

-1 Narcomoeba
-1 Driven // Despair

Game one of this matchup centers around trying to force a threat through countermagic, so consider waiting to set up a double spell instead of jamming into three open mana. If you have four mana left and want to cast a threat into open mana, you should try to play Undercity Informer over Balustrade Spy so that you can use the mana you would spend on activating Informer to pay for a potential Censor.

We never want to return Narcomoeba in this matchup because it exposes Prized Amalgam to Extinction Event, so we can safely board it out. They also can't produce meaningful numbers of blockers, so we're safe to board out Driven // Despair as well. They typically only have at most one piece of graveyard hate, against which we only want the one Thassa's Oracle, but you can board in more if your opponent appears to be packing more than that.

Vs. Jeskai Lukka

+4 Thoughtseize
+1 Duress
+1 Thassa's Oracle

-1 Narcomoeba

Narcomoeba comes out because we want to delay Prized Amalgam to play around Anger of the Gods. In game one the worst thing their Polymorph effects can do to you is steal a mana source, so they're mostly sitting ducks. In game two they can find Resolute Archangel instead to go back to 20 life after Creeping Chill goes off. This still leaves you with a board in play though, so you can just Driven // Despair and attack to leave them dead on board the next turn with no cards in hand.

If they show you graveyard hate you can board in more copies of Thassa's Oracle instead of, or in addition to, some of the discard spells.

Vs. Mono-Green Devotion

+2 Natural State
+3 Abrupt Decay
+1 Thassa's Oracle

Their deck is far, far slower than yours, so they rely on graveyard hate from Karn, the Great Creator to beat you. In game one this means it's a race to combo where their combo is just "cast Karn and minus for Tormod's Crypt", but they lack redundancy so our turn threes are far more consistent than theirs.

Post-board we get extra means of beating their graveyard hate (though we can still just race them too) while they struggle to improve thanks to spending their entire sideboard on wish targets.

Thoughtseize is a cleaner answer to Karn, the Great Creator than the Disenchant effects, as it stops it from tutoring a second lock piece, but a lot of Mono-Green players will board in some amount of cheap graveyard hate in an effort to give themselves more outs when mulliganing. With that in mind, I'd rather just bring in the disenchants so Thoughtseize doesn't find itself late to the party against a turn-one Grafdigger's Cage or fail to answer a Karn off the top of their library.

Vs. Niv to Light

+4 Thoughtseize
+1 Duress
+4 Thassa's Oracle

-1 Driven // Despair
-1 Silversmote Ghoul
-1 Prized Amalgam
-1 Haunted Dead

Like against Mono-Green, game one is just a race to kill on turn four before they Bring to Light for a Slaughter Games on Worldspine Wurm. Unlike against Mono-Green though, they tend to have actual sideboard cards to bring in for the post-board games. Between Slaughter Games effects, Shadows' Verdict, Bring to Light to find either, and potentially even additional graveyard hate on top of all that, winning via damage becomes extremely unreliable in this matchup.

Accordingly, we look to trim some of the overkill combo pieces to more reliably focus on protecting ourselves from Slaughter Games with discard spells and winning via Thassa's Oracle. You do still have enough damage to win normally if your draw happens to be too fast for them, or if a discard spell lets you know the coast is clear.

Vs. Lotus Combo

+4 Thoughtseize
+1 Necromentia
+1 Thassa's Oracle

-1 Driven // Despair

This matchup is largely just a race, and you are much faster. The discard spells are nice to have, but don't play one over just putting your cards on the table. You often want to delay returning Prized Amalgam to play around Anger of the Gods, but occasionally they have enough blockers to live through your attack by using Fae of Wishes to find Tormod's Crypt and exile your graveyard. In that case you should just return Narcomoeba and hope they don't have an Anger. Name Lotus Field with Necromentia if you can resolve it before they get one in play. Otherwise, you typically name Fae of Wishes.

Vs. Sultai Delirium

+2 Abrupt Decay
+4 Thassa's Oracle

The type and amount of hate they have access to can vary a lot, but typically involves a healthy dose of Soul-Guide Lantern and some amount of Necromentia. Since they also have one-for-one interaction for our threats like Thoughtseize and Mystical Dispute, we can't afford to devote too much focus to narrow anti-hate cards. Instead we just want to rely on Thassa's Oracle as a catch-all.

Abrupt Decay can still tag Jace, Vryn's Prodigy or at least Uro, Titan of Nature's Wrath when it isn't killing Soul-Guide Lantern though, so it's a reasonable hedge in small doses.

Vs. Oops All Spells (The Mirror)

+4 Thoughtseize
+1 Duress
+1 Thassa's Oracle
+1 Necromentia

If you draw it, Necromentia prevents your opponent from winning via combat damage. You exile Worldspine Wurm from their library so that if they mill themselves they die in their draw step. This forces them to win by Thassa's Oracle or random beats.

Once you've removed their copies of Worldspine Wurm from their deck, you can target them with your mill cards to empty their deck before they get a chance to set those things up, provided your life total isn't low enough that you die to Creeping Chill triggers. Also keep in mind that you can attempt to mana screw your opponent by taking lands or mana dorks rather than mill cards if that's the resource they're light on.