I am going to continue going over the deck I made top eight with in Denver:

I like how the maindeck is configured. There are a lot of four-ofs because the deck wants to be redundant and draw the most important cards to get the Panharmonicon engine going. For game two the gameplan sometimes needs to be adjusted significantly. Panharmonicon is meant to be strong against midrange decks game one, so for those matchups I don't sideboard much. Other matchups, like Mardu Vehicles, are much trickier, and require lots of sideboard slots to try to flip the matchup in your favor.

There are many different decks in Standard beyond just the top handful. In the videos we see how to sideboard against some of the more obscure archetypes. Here are some general sideboarding principles geared towards the top decks in the format. Let's break down some matchups:

Aggro

This category encompasses most of the aggressive decks in the format, from various vehicle-based strategies to B/R Madness. I advocate dedicating nine or ten sideboard slots to these matchups. This means boarding in a lot of cards, but the reason for doing so is the Panharmonicon engine is too slow to beat these decks. Sometimes to beat your worst matchup game one it requires dedicating most of your sideboard to that matchup, and that's okay. Here is how I board:

-3 Panharmonicon
-1 Cloudblazer
-1 Eldrazi Displacer
-2 Smuggler's Copter
-1 Thraben Inspector
-1 Pilgrim's Eye
-1 Thought-Knot Seer

+2 Aether Meltdown
+2 Linvala, the Preserver
+3 Fragmentize
+2 Filigree Familiar
+1 Immolating Glare

Glint-Nest Crane is good against the aggressive decks. The issue is that a lot of the maindeck artifacts are not. This is why Filigree Familiar is good — it allows you to have different artifacts to find off Glint-Nest Crane even though you boarded out Smuggler's Copter and Panharmonicon. Linvala, the Preserver is very important as well, in order to easily close the game out. White-Blue Panharmonicon can struggle to actually win the game once many of the Panharmonicons get boarded out. Opposing Planeswalkers like Gideon, Ally of Zendikar are a major problem.

The other slots are spot removal so that you have the ability to disrupt the opponent's start. Aether Meltdown is the best answer to a Scrapheap Scrounger. The most impressive card for me out of the sideboard, though, has been Fragmentize. Beyond Smuggler's Copter out of the aggressive decks, there are a lot of decks you want to board Fragmentize in against because of the popularity of artifacts and enchantments.

Other cards to consider: Blessed Alliance, Declaration in Stone. A lot of the removal is interchangeable, and each has its own set of issues. This is why I could see adding in Blessed Alliance or Declaration in Stone. Blessed Alliance is specifically good when the opponent is trying to burn you out.

Control

We saw how grindy the games against control can be. It is important to have all your card advantage cards if possible. Westvale Abbey is clutch as a way of closing the game out. Unfortunately, game three against U/B Control we just flooded out too much. All the cards you sideboard in here have some overlap with other matchups, which is a nice luxury.

-3 Reflector Mage-2 Skysovereign, Consul Flagship-2 Panharmonicon

+2 Spell Shrivel
+1 Negate
+1 Summary Dismissal
+1 Thought-Knot Seer
+2 Filigree Familiar

We shave cards that are specifically good against creatures and some Panharmonicons. The sideboard plan should be somewhat flexible based on what cards the opponent is playing. For instance, Fragmentize can come in if you see or suspect multiple copies of Dynavolt Tower. More Reflector Mages can stay in if you suspect more creatures than just Torrential Gearhulk. Making those types of adjustment is important.

Other cards to consider: Negate and Dispel. We wish we had room for more countermagic, and if you really wanted to make the control matchup better I would add more counters.

Aetherworks Marvel

This matchup can create some long games. The goal is not to die right away, but also to win before the opponent can hardcast huge fatties like Ulamog, the Ceaseless Hunger.

-1 Thraben Inspector
-1 Glint-Nest Crane
-1 Smuggler's Copter
-1 Reflector Mage
-1 Panharmonicon
-1 Skysovereign, Consul Flagship

+2 Spell Shrivel
+1 Negate
+1 Summary Dismissal
+1 Thought-Knot Seer
+1 Fragmentize

This is the definition of shaving. We want countermagic and interaction to stop Aetherworks Marvel, but at the same time keep as much of the primary gameplan intact as possible. Casting Summary Dismissal on an Eldrazi feels great when it happens.

Other cards to consider: Thought-Knot Seer. With Aetherworks Marvel being so popular I am tempted to add more Thought-Knot Seers to the board. The issue is the amount of colorless sources is questionable, so that might require adding some Aether Hubs to the maindeck.

B/G Delirium

This matchup doesn't require much at all, the matchup is great game one, and doesn't change much after sideboarding.

-1 Pilgrim's Eye
-1 Thraben Inspector

+1 Thought-Knot Seer
+1 Summary Dismissal

W/U Flash

Here is a matchup where the games can be interesting and go long. It is important to realize what Counterspells the opponent may be representing at all stages of the game. Spell Queller is the most important card to play around when possible. Spell Shrivel comes in here in large part as a clean answer to Archangel Avacyn.

-2 Thraben Inspector
-2 Panharmonicon
-1 Thought-Knot Seer
-1 Reflector Mage

+2 Spell Shrivel
+3 Fragmentize
+1 Linvala, the Preserver

Fragmentize is great against W/U Flash as a way to destroy a Smuggler's Copter or Stasis Snare. It may seem weird to only board in one Linvala, the Preserver, but it is hard to find the right opening to cast her sometimes, and drawing both does come up.

Other cards to consider: Spell Queller. It is weird but this is a matchup I could see wanting Spell Queller, and it could come in for other matchups too. Most Flash players will board out Reflector Mages against you, so there would be less ways to remove Spell Queller from play. In the end I didn't get a chance to try Spell Queller, but if we don't have them in the maindeck, I'm not sure we can afford all the sideboard slots they would take up.

Thanks for reading,

Seth Manfield