Blue/Red Goggles is a relatively new archetype, so it is not clear what the optimal 75 is. This version has a bit more early removal in order to help combat the aggressive decks. While the deck does have access to the Pyromancer's Goggles engine, that is only one aspect of the deck. This is a blue/red control deck that needs to prolong the game, but the reason it works so well are the red card-draw spells.

DECKID=1264050

There aren't many high-quality, cheap card-draw options. Even something like Divination is unavailable. Magmatic Insight and Tormenting Voice fit perfectly here, and fill a key role as cards that work well with Pyromancer's Goggles and fill up the graveyard to be able to quickly flip Jace, Vryn's Prodigy. This deck doesn't play many threats, so being able to find the ones it does play is important.

I can see shaving some spot removal here, which would make the deck more similar to most of the current lists, but it really is dependent on the metagame. Fiery Impulse is a great way to kill many of the most annoying creatures in Standard, as many Mono-White Humans and Bant Company threats have three toughness. Later in the game, Fiery Temper can be used profitably to shoot down more threats, while playing it for the madness cost. While the maindeck is tuned towards Humans and Bant Company these weren't the archetypes we played against.

Unfortunately I can't control what other players are playing on Magic Online even though it seems like the two most popular decks in person are Humans and Bant Company that doesn't automatically translate to online play. In fact lately I have been playing a ton against White/Black Control and Red/Green Ramp. So let's go ahead and dig into those matchups, as clearly the Blue/Red Goggles deck isn't great versus those two decks, but that doesn't mean there is not play to the games.

White/Black Control is a deck centered around Planeswalkers and Secure the Wastes. This means that the one-for-one removal spells in the deck aren't as good as they normally would be. However, the Blue/Red Goggles deck is capable of fighting through a number of threats. After sideboard, having access to both Negate and Fevered Visions dramatically shifts how the matchup plays out. When on the play, casting turn-three Fevered Visions is ridiculously powerful, but if you're behind it is not as good. Negate counters practically everything in the Black/White deck, so while they are a bit overtaxed, they do help a lot to keep planeswalkers off the table.

The issue though is if our draw has holes in it discard spells can pick the Blue/Red Goggles hand apart and force us to draw off the top. Black/White Control isn't a matchup I would want to play against with Blue/Red Goggles but at the same time it is not the deck's worst matchup.

Ramp, on the other hand, is the worst matchup, and while we were able to steal a game on the back of Fevered Visions and Eldrazi Obligator, our opponent took us by surprise in game three.

Often it is difficult to know exactly how many cheap creatures are in the ramp deck. Games one and two we only saw mana creatures but then the combination of Sylvan Advocate and Tireless Tracker were quite effective when there was not as much removal left in our deck for the final game. Ramp has problems against the aggressive Humans strategies, but versus our deck that has Pyromancer's Goggles and Fevered Visions after board, World Breaker can become difficult to handle. Generally the way we win this match is by flipping Thing in the Ice early in the game, but unfortunately, having cut down on them in this list and subsequently not finding them, we were unable to execute that plan. Playing only two Thing in the Ice may seem a bit unusual but they can be a bad draw later in the game.

Overall Blue-Red Goggles is a deck I expect to see represented at the Pro Tour, and while this list is a bit unusual, it is worth trying out. There are some slots open for debate in the Blue/Red Goggles deck and we see a lot of cards overlapping throughout the various versions of Blue/Red Control.

Thanks for reading,

Seth Manfield